Student athletes juggle time to manage school, work and sports – The Channels

Aly+Springer+pictured+with+his+colleagues+at+Santa+Barbara+Polo+and+Racquet+Club+at+Carpinteria%2C+Calif.+Photo+provided+courtesy+of+Springer .

Callahan Morgan

Aly Springer pictured with her colleagues at the Santa Barbara Polo and Racquet Club in Carpinteria, California. Photo courtesy of Springer.

City College student-athletes have demanding schedules that require time management. According to athletic director LaDeane Hansten, there are up to 400 student-athletes at City College. While balancing classes with workouts, some of these student-athletes have put the icing on the cake of their already busy schedules and are working part-time.

Defensive midfielder Sarah Hardin (#5) heads a ball towards a teammate during women's soccer practice October 19 at La Playa Stadium in Santa Barbara, California.
Defensive midfielder Sarah Hardin (#5) heads a ball towards a teammate during women’s soccer practice October 19 at La Playa Stadium in Santa Barbara, California. (Callahan Morgan)

Sarah Hardin is a student athlete at City College on the women’s soccer team. She also works part-time at La Cumbre Country Club as a busser. It’s her second year as a student-athlete and she’s mastered her time management to maintain a balanced lifestyle.

“I work 15 hours a week,” Hardin said. “I also babysit for three hours every Monday night.”

Hardin attends classes and practices while working 18 hours a week. She has no days off, every weekday and weekend is filled with school, homework, practice, games or shifts.

“That was my program yesterday. I woke up at 5:45 a.m. to study for my exam, took my exam from 8 a.m. to 9:25 a.m., then had a lab from 9:40 a.m. to 2:20 p.m.,” Hardin said. “But training starts at 2 p.m. so I always have to leave early. I trained from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. then took a shower and went to work from 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

She acknowledges her long days and remembers how lucky she is to have these opportunities and to work hard. “I have long days but it’s ok. I learned to prioritize eating well and getting enough sleep,” Hardin said.

Hardin gets along well with his colleagues and teammates, which makes it easier for him to maintain a positive attitude even when things get overwhelming.

Forward Aly Springer (#23) lines up the ball for a kick on goal during a women's soccer practice October 19 at La Playa Stadium in Santa Barbara, California.  While the players performed a wide variety of drills, Springer focused on offensive drills.  to solidify his shooting ability.
Forward Aly Springer (#23) lines up the ball for a kick on goal during a women’s soccer practice October 19 at La Playa Stadium in Santa Barbara, California. While the players performed a wide variety of drills, Springer focused on offensive drills. to solidify his shooting ability. (Callahan Morgan)

Aly Springer is also a City College athlete on the women’s soccer team. She works at the Santa Barbara Polo and Racket Club at the Field Side Grill in Carpinteria. Springer works about 18 hours a week as a waiter.

She embraces this busy time in her life and is grateful for the experience. “Knowing that I’m spending my time in the best way possible comes full circle at the end of the day,” she said.

Springer has found helpful ways to make her schedule a little easier on her; she likes to do her homework early and have a head start so she can enjoy her weekends and free time.

She knows how important it is to spend time socializing and doesn’t neglect this part of her life, even with school, football and work.

“I try to do all my homework during the week so I have Saturday to hang out or even just watch the sunset with friends,” Springer said.

Security guard Joseph Olsson pictured at work with Backstage Bar colleagues Mitch Cunningham (center) and Sandro Cate (right) in Santa Barbara, California.  Photo courtesy of Olsson.
Security guard Joseph Olsson pictured at work with colleagues at the Backstage Bar in Santa Barbara, California. Photo courtesy of Olsson.

Joseph Olsson is a City College athlete on the football team. He works security at Backstage, a nightclub in downtown Santa Barbara. Olsson works around 20 hours a week, normally from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m.

“Since working those hours, I’ve learned to prioritize my sleep,” he said.

Although Olsson has a busy schedule, he finds joy in chaos and enjoys meeting new people at work, school and football.

“I work and I learn a lot,” he says. “I meet a lot of different personalities and people who teach me a lot.” He knows that these new experiences and these new people at this time of his life will teach him a lot. Olsson’s mindset helps him through his demanding schedule and devotes his strong mentality to football.

Linebacker Joseph Olsson (#48) sprints forward during a defensive drill during daily soccer practice October 19 at La Playa Stadium in Santa Barbara, California.  To his right is linebacker coach Jackson Weed, who led the practice drill.
Linebacker Joseph Olsson (#48) sprints forward during a defensive drill during daily soccer practice October 19 at La Playa Stadium in Santa Barbara, California. To his right is linebacker coach Jackson Weed, who led the practice drill. (Callahan Morgan)

Student-athletes must maintain a GPA of 2.0 in order to participate in their athletic program. This means they must earn a grade of C or better in all of their classes. Per week, they train about 10 hours and spend 5-12 hours playing games and traveling.

Some might say that being a student-athlete is a full-time job in itself.

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