You are currently viewing Grant will allow some Florida medical students to graduate debt-free

Grant will allow some Florida medical students to graduate debt-free

A Boca Raton couple has awarded Florida Atlantic University a $28 million grant so select medical students can graduate debt-free. University leaders say Ann and John Wood’s donation is historic and marks the next chapter for the university. of the nation’s most popular medical schools,” said FAU President John Kelly. Game Day: Florida Atlantic University medical students get game day residency assignments. students graduate debt-free and out-of-state students to attend at the student rate, which the school’s dean and vice president hope to solve a projected shortage of doctors. ‘Right now 30% of our students stay in Florida and 50% of our residents do,’ Julie Pilitsis said. ‘I enjoy seeing patients’: Wellington doctor likes to do house calls echangeur.”The costs are very high and my parents can’t really afford to pay anything,” Grela said. “It’s something that has always stressed me out a lot. It never really deterred me from pursuing this career, but it was something that always pricked my brain and stabbed me. Grela is from Miami and says he hopes to work in Florida after he finishes medical school. He says the Wood family grants allowed him to focus more on his studies and less on getting a part-time job to pay for his education. like research,” Grela said. Follow us on social networks: Facebook | Twitter | instagram

A Boca Raton couple has awarded Florida Atlantic University a $28 million grant so select medical students can graduate debt-free.

University leaders say Ann and John Wood’s donation is historic and marks the next chapter for the university.

“This is going to make it one of the most popular medical schools in the country,” said FAU President John Kelly.

Game day: Florida Atlantic University medical students get game day residency assignments

The FAU expects the state to be short of 18,000 doctors by 2035.

The grant will allow in-state students to graduate debt-free and out-of-state students to attend at the student rate, which the school’s dean and vice president hope solves a expected shortage of doctors.

“Right now, 30% of our students stay in Florida and 50% of our residents do,” Julie Pilitsis said.

‘I enjoy seeing patients’: Wellington doctor likes to make house calls

For students like Ivan Grela, the son of Argentine immigrants, financial aid for school is a game-changer.

“The costs are very high and my parents can’t really afford to pay anything,” Grela said. “It was something that always stressed me out a lot. It never really deterred me from pursuing this career, but it was something that always stabbed my brain and stabbed me.

Grela is from Miami and says he hopes to work in Florida after he finishes medical school. He says the Wood family grants allowed him to focus more on his studies and less on getting a part-time job to pay for his education.

“Just having that burden lifted off your shoulders can help you spend more time doing other things like research,” Grela said.

Follow us on social networks: Facebook | Twitter | instagram

Leave a Reply